WhyBooksAreLife

bethrevis:

bethrevis:

Remember those AMAZING portraits of Amy and Elder that Christine Tyler did for the Across the Universe series? I got her to make portraits of the main characters of my next book, The Body Electric, Jack and Ella!

As with the first two portraits, there is a TON of symbolism in these two. Bees and fireflies; trees and waves; torn flags and broken strings; colors and clothing. Seriously: nearly every aspect of these two illustrations holds a very important piece of symbolism relevant to the story. 

Here’s your mission—and a chance to win a complete signed trilogy of my first three books, plus a signed and numbered, limited edition of my new book, The Body Electricplus art cards with these illustrations printed on them! 

  • Examine the portraits of Jack and Ella closely—you can click on them to embiggen.
  • Reblog, tweet, and/or FB with a link describing what you think one thing in the illustration may symbolize. Example: ”I think the knife in Jack’s boot means he’s a soldier!” (If you FB or tweet, make sure you tag me so I see it.)

I will randomly select one winner to receive four signed books. All entries must be posted by midnight on August 1, 2014. Contest open internationally; if you’re younger than 18 years old, you need your parent/guardian’s permission to enter and receive a prize. Prize will be mailed when The Body Electric releases this fall. 

Winner will be announced in my newsletter, along with a cover reveal of The Body Electric and a full description of what each of the symbols in the illustrations actually mean. You can subscribe and see it all delivered in your email inbox!

Get entering! Let me know your guesses of what you think the symbolism in The Body Electric could be & win FOUR SIGNED BOOKS!

Signal boost! And friendly reminder that you need to reblog with your guesses about the pics for it to count! 

I would like to guess that the symbolism in the smaller circles around both images represent opposite traits of both characters. I believe that the small images in Ella’s picture represent that she’s a dreamer (I think they look like little sheeps!) and that the phases of the moon in Jack’s image represent that he believes that everything is written in the stars.
Just a guess, I’m no expert on symbolism.

bethrevis:

ghostales:

My beloved bookshelves ♥

One of the most beautiful bookshelves I’ve ever seen! 

mrsweasley:

jebiwonkenobi:

I never feel like more of a failure than when I can’t remember a piece of Harry Potter trivia. 

image

image

(via findinghomeinabook)

delta-breezes:

Gracelaced

kissabookworm:

when someone judges you for your preferred book genre

image

(via bethrevis)

The modern history of swearing: Where all the dirtiest words come from

lauriehalseanderson:

dduane:

Some fascinating stuff here. But this bit brought me up short.

Though Victorian people were swearing in much the same way that we do today, not all the bad words of the time are as familiar as fucking bitch. Many of these words rich and strange are not swearwords per se but terms for topics so esoterically taboo that they would never have come up in polite conversation. In his 1785 “Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue,” Francis Grose includes to huffle, which is “a piece of bestiality too filthy for explanation.” (The 1788 and 1823 editions decide that discretion is the better part of valor and fail to mention the bestial practice at all.) Grose also lists “to bagpipe, a lascivious practice too indecent for explanation.” Even Farmer and Henley, brave champions of obscenity who boldly explained fucking, refuse to define to bagpipe in their dictionary — they simply repeat Grose’s definition manqué. One hopes for something really spectacular from these words, but they are simply the Victorian version of blow job, slang for fellatio, a practice evidently much more shocking one or two centuries ago. Another popular Victorian word for this lascivity was gamahuche. It derives from French, so it probably was a euphemism used in order to lift the tone of huffle and bagpipe out of the gutter. It more properly means “mouth on genitals,” as it can be used for both fellatio and cunnilingus.

"Huffle…", though. Oh dear. (Leaving us with the terrible possibility that in some circumstances, "hufflepuff" is a verb.)

Gods above, I love language.

tattoolit:

Beckett quotation. Post-breakup tattoo, to remind me to always dust myself off and get back up again.

This could also work with a MULTITUDE of other situations. The first one that came to my mind was writing. I haven’t accomplished writing the next great American novel…. Yet. But I will continue to try!!

tattoolit:

Beckett quotation. Post-breakup tattoo, to remind me to always dust myself off and get back up again.

This could also work with a MULTITUDE of other situations. The first one that came to my mind was writing. I haven’t accomplished writing the next great American novel…. Yet. But I will continue to try!!

I honestly have no idea who made this, but they are amazing. I was so happy to immediately recognize the quote from William Herondale in cassandraclare's Infernal Devices trilogy. I loved it. :3
duttonbooks:

Simple and accurate (well, at least in our opinion) 

duttonbooks:

Simple and accurate (well, at least in our opinion) 

(Source: simonschusterca, via lauriehalseanderson)

On writing and handwriting.

bethrevis:

cassandraclare:

Cassandra, as a reader I have supported you from the beginning. I have honestly purchased your novels and thoroughly enjoyed them all. A few months back, I preordered the signed copy of CoHF and I was absolutely thrilled; I couldn’t wait for it to come in the mail. So when it finally does, I tear…

This…this really struck me. 

I remember being at a group signing a few years ago. I sat beside a fellow author who had impeccable, beautiful handwriting. Like, the kind of handwriting used in textbooks, it was that good. 

I…do not have that kind of handwriting. I have a scribble. There’s a “B” and some bumps, and and “R” and some bumps, and that’s it. 

People went down the line. Someone comments that the author beside me had handwriting so perfect that it looked like it was printed in the book, not like a real signature. Someone else commented that my scribble was barely legible. 

Both of these comments were presented in a way that implied we were wrong. 

I know I will never please everyone. Ever. But please do keep in mind that the thing you’re complaining about isn’t us being disrespectful. It’s us being human. 

anonynaila:

subvertcliche:

mello-dramatic:

Everyone who reblogs this will get the title of a book to read based on their bio/posts.

Everyone. I mean it.

THIS IS THE BEST POST

I HAVE EVER SEEN

EVER

they really do mean everyone

(via thatshypalegirl)

captain-mycaptain:

dirku:

nonomella:

that terrifying moment when everything is happily resolved but the book still has 200 pages left

that terrifying moment when there’s too many things that need resolving but the book has only 20 pages left

EITHER WAY

IT’S JUST LIKE

image

(via findinghomeinabook)

me:

reads books

me:

spends money on books

me:

talks about books

me:

laughs about books

me:

cries about books

me:

thinks about books

me:

sniffs books

me:

touches books

me:

sleeps with books

me:

writes about books

me:

blogs about books

me:

books

“I began to realize how important it was to be an enthusiast in life. If you are interested in something, no matter what it is, go at it full speed ahead. Embrace it with both arms, hug it, love it and above all become passionate about it. Lukewarm is no good.”

—   Roald Dahl (via isawtoday)

(Source: onlinecounsellingcollege, via bethrevis)

karamazove:

1.Wall of books —  Amsterdam

2.Bookstore Mural — Pittsboro

3.Inside a Bookshelf —  Sweden

4.Library Mural — Poland

5.Flying Books — San Francisco

6.Heart, Culture and Pedagogy — Canada

7.La Bibliotèque De La Cité — France

8.Larchmere Mural — Ohio

9.Duluth Public Library - Minnesota

10.Transformer Books —  Russia

(via lauriehalseanderson)